Mar 132017
 


Sunday, March 26, 4:00-5:00 p.m.
EWC Imin Center – Jefferson Hall

The first in a new series of public performance-demonstrations, this program will be part explanation and part demonstration of the art of Kyogen, Japan’s signature comic theatre form. Featuring acclaimed Kyoto-based actor Doji Shigeyama with University of Hawaii Theatre students.

Populated by wily servants, self-important lords, tricksters, very human deities, and larger than life characters, the Japanese medieval comedy form of Kyogen is just as accessible to today’s audience as it was 600 years ago. Like other comedy genres, which bring much needed laughter into our lives, Kyogen has also long been a gently effective way of delivering political and social criticism. Guest Kyogen Master Doji Shigeyama will provide an up close and personal Kyogen primer sharing behind-the-scenes stories about the training of a professional Kyogen performer, as well as the training of UHM students in preparation for the April 2017 Kyogen production, POWER AND FOLLY: Japanese Satire for the 21st Century. Come discover the process of adapting text and performance from Japanese to English, enjoy select scenes from the upcoming plays, and learn to laugh as you never have before.

Feb 072017
 

UH Mānoa Orvis Auditorium

Saturday, April 1, 4:00–5:30 p.m.

Sunday, April 2, 4:00–5:30 p.m.

The Myanmar Marionette Theatre is at the forefront of restoring the enchanting 18th c. Burmese puppet tradition and developing a new generation of artists and audiences. Suitable for children and adults, the performance will showcase puppeteers accompanied by live traditional music.

Feb 022017
 


January 29 – May 21, 2017

Curators: Virginia Henderson, Tim Webster, Michael Schuster
Photographer: Tim Webster
Installation Design: Lynne Najita
Assistant Curator: Annie Reynolds

Yangon Echoes invites viewers behind the facades of century-old colonial buildings, inside heritage homes, to explore the lives of people living in the city formerly known as Rangoon.

This exhibition explores notions and values of heritage and home at a time of unprecedented change. It presents intimate views of domestic life while tracing the emergence of this city from decades of stagnation to its engagement with a rapidly changing world.

Today, Yangon is probably changing more rapidly than any other urban space in the world. Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, is confronting the juggernaut of global capital after fifty years of isolation under socialist military rule.

Encountering this sudden turnaround, Yangon residents are grappling with these questions: What is the role of heritage at such a time of profound political, economic and social change? What do heritage and home mean to each of us? How are we informed by the past and what are our means for survival amidst the challenges of great flux?

Yangon Echoes, an oral history listening project, investigates multicultural diversity and individual everyday lived experiences, revealing the vulnerabilities and pressures on Yangon’s people and its heritage today.

The storytellers share thoughts and feelings, speaking of joy and tragedy, simple pleasures and aching issues. Told with courage and charm, the informal stories of home offer insight into what has happened and is happening to the city.

This exhibition, a popular history of buildings, charts social space and urban folklore, linking past to present via living memories.

Click here to download the exhibit handout.


East-West Center Gallery
John A. Burns Hall, 1601 East-West Road
(corner Dole St. & East-West Rd.)

Gallery admission is free.

Hours: Open Weekdays 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. and Sundays Noon–4:00 p.m.
Closed Saturdays, Feb. 20, Apr. 16, May 29

Parking on the UH-Mānoa campus is normally free and ample on Sundays.

Free school & group tours available

For further information: 944-7177
arts@EastWestCenter.org